Lost Poem by Redeait Meaza!

Lost Poem by Redeait Meaza! #poet #blogger #poetry #art #expression

 

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Come out to The Pink Ribbon Fashion Show in MD!

Hey readers,

Please come out and support a good cause this Sunday!

MODELS INC. Presents… The Pink Ribbon! Breast Cancer Awareness

FASHION SHOW

* Benefiting: Supporting Our Sisters International Foundation. *

Sunday, December 18, 2016

Doors Open: 6:30pm  Catwalk Show: 7:00pm

4D Arts Studio: 3135 Pennsy Drive Landover, Md 20785 General Admission: $20 Online Tickets: thepinkribbon.eventbrite.com 

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The Shoot Women Fashion Artist Spotlight: Taylor White

Hey readers,

I had the opportunity to see Taylor White amazing artworks on display at Blind Whino in Washington DC. She is one artist to keep a look out for because she has the raw talent that can’t be denied. Enjoy my interview with Taylor and her beautiful artwork.

1. What’s your name and where are you from (State/
Nationality)?
My name is Taylor White, I grew up and currently live in Raleigh,
North Carolina.

2. When did you know you wanted to be an artist and what
kind of artist would you consider yourself?
Being an artist is something that has felt true throughout my entire life,
and though I hesitate to fully define my creative output I could best be
described currently as a painter and muralist peripherally attached to the
street art/urban contemporary genre.

3. Are you a full-time artist or are you involved with other
creative jobs?

I work full-time as an artist. I also manage a studio space in my
hometown which helps to supplement the income I make from
paintings, murals, and commissions.

4. Your artwork has movement and emotion would you say
your artwork is influenced by pain, passion or a
combination of both?
My work is influenced by the human experience which I think is equal
parts pain and passion. All of these things exist as dualities, and
harmony exists when you have a delicate balance of both. It isn’t
meant to have a positive or negative connotation; it’s only meant to
be true and authentic to our emotional experiences.

5. What foils your creative juices? Do you have a specific
music playlist or just need to be in quiet scenery in order
to feel inspired to paint?
A mix of things – I find I do my best work when I am the most relaxed,
so self-care is really important. Getting away to nature when I’m
feeling too fraught in my head; giving myself permission to slow
down when I’m feeling too stressed. I almost always have some
music going, usually some combination of downtempo electronic,
r&b or hip hop.

6. Are your artworks reflected on your personal experience
or is inspired by what you see in the world?
I think both, for sure. I observe, absorb, and filter things through my
personal experience before I’m able to form a cogent expression that I
feel is important enough to convey. Some I consider interesting, others
not. Or rather, certain things feel like it’s up to me to communicate and
others do not. My work is much more intuitive and emotional than
cerebral or socially conscious. I speak to an experience which is
universal; we all occupy this coalescence of matter, roughly the same
shape and configuration, and move through space by the same physical
laws. That’s what unifies us. That’s what fascinates me so much about
dancing, which is the physical experience that provides me the most
inspiration. It provides a universally recognizable visual language for
that which cannot be seen, only felt. The work aims to capture the
emotive essence of the human spirit, as the act of dance does so
exquisitely.

7. What message do you want to give to the world with
your artwork and why should people care about your
artistry?
I think the most meaningful thing you can do as an artist is to be open
and authentic, to be able to say “this is what it looks like when I
lay bare the secrets of my soul.” Once you are keyed into that
power, you can empower those who view your work to connect
with who they are. The work either resonates or it doesn’t,
positive, negative or neutral – which, if you’re listening, will tell
you a lot about what’s in your soul and connect you to your reason
for being. In my work, I invite the viewer to connect with
themselves. I don’t even really see the work by the time it’s done,
so it’s really about the audience’s reactions. My work is as much a
celebration of you as it is for me; it’s a celebration of the spirit. If I
can at least have faith in what I have made, that it has meaning to
me and whoever has seen it, then I’ve done well. That lives on.

8. What is your ultimate goal you want to achieve as an
artist in the next 5-10 years?
Everyone seeks recognition for their work, myself included, but a wise
friend once told me that the greatest reward for work is more work. I’d
be meeting my goals if I had a steady influx of exciting projects that
allowed me to maintain a comfortable standard of living.

9. Do you have any advice for someone who wants to be in
your shoes?
My best advice is not to wait around for advice; get involved and do
everything you can to put your work out there into the world. Have
confidence in your work, be authentic and keep pushing. If you do it
well you’ll find success in your own way.

10. Where should people go to contact you or to just
follow you on social media?
You can find my website at taylurk.com and follow my Instagram
@taylurk for timely updates.